Photo courtesy of the City of Seattle and Tim Rice Aerials

Your Guide to Waterfront Park

Scroll through our guide to learn all about the exciting transformations and activations coming to downtown Seattle’s iconic Waterfront, as we count down to the Park’s Grand Opening in 2025!

Dozens of members from Tribal Nations arrive at the Pier 62 Floating Dock on their different canoes.

Photo from Salmon Homecoming 2023 by Jo Cosme

An attendee weaves raffia and cattail fibers into a medallion at the We Are Water Weaving Workshop in 2023. Photo by Raven's Tale Studio.

Flags from a flag-making activity at We Are Water 2023, facilitated by Raven Juarez, flying high at Pier 62. Photo by Jordan Remington.

Dzidzilalich: A Coast Salish Waterfront

Land Acknowledgement

Waterfront Park is situated on the land of the Coast Salish Peoples, who have resided here since time immemorial and continue to thrive. With respect and humility, we acknowledge the history of the waterfront, the dispossession of land from the Coast Salish people, and most importantly, the strength and resilience of the native people and their culture through this history to the present.

This acknowledgment serves only as a first step in honoring the land that we occupy and the first peoples of that land. Friends recognizes that this will be long and evolving work to build and repair relationships with Native communities.

What is Dzidzilalich?

The City has given Alaskan Way and Elliott Way, between Pioneer Square and Belltown, the honorary name Dzidzilalich (pronounced: dzee-dzuh-lah-leech) to honor the lands and shared waters of the Puget Sound Coast Salish People.

Per the Office of the Waterfront and Civic Projects, “Dzidzilalich means ‘little crossing-over place’ in Lushootseed, one of the languages of the Coast Salish people, and refers to one of the several villages that once stood here.” The Suquamish and Muckleshoot Tribal Councils provided guidance to the city of Seattle’s Mayor’s Office, the Office of the Waterfront and Civic Projects and the Seattle Department of Transportation in the process of selecting Dzidzilalich as the honorary name for this roadway. Follow the links below to learn more.

Left: Overlook Walk. Image by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle. Right: The waterfront shortly before the Alaskan Way Viaduct was removed in 2019.

An aerial photograph of the Seattle Waterfront featuring Pier 56, Miner's Landing, and the Seattle Great Wheel on the left, and Downtown Seattle to the right.

Photo courtesy of the City of Seattle and Tim Rice Aerials

Viaduct before demolition

The Alaskan Way Viaduct in 2009. Image by Nick Brown.

Heavy machinery tears down the Alaskan Way Viaduct with the Seattle Great Wheel in the background.

Demolition of the Alaskan Way Viaduct in 2019.

20 Acres Connecting City and Sound

Waterfront Park serves as a new public space where the Alaskan Way Viaduct once stood. From its southernmost tip in the Stadium district, to the northern end in Belltown, Waterfront Park is gradually becoming a space for all to gather and reconnect with one another and the environment.

Scroll down to read more about the different sections of the park, upcoming activations and features, and see what’s been going on since things opened up in 2020!

Photo by Land Morphology, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Photo by Land Morphology, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Working in Partnership

Waterfront Park is made possible thanks to the collaboration of multiple organizations. To help make sense of the different entities you may encounter throughout this page, here’re some brief descriptions of the major groups who’re bringing Waterfront Park to life.

  • City of Seattle’s Office of the Waterfront and Civic Projects leads the “Waterfront Seattle” effort: a multi-year investment by the City to construct new waterfront infrastructure such as the park promenade and Overlook Walk, rebuild Pier 58 and Pier 62, and improve east-west connections between downtown and Elliott Bay.
  • Friends of Waterfront Park is the 501c3 not for profit responsible for fundraising, stewarding, and programming at Waterfront Park alongside our community – today and into the future.
  • Seattle Center manages operations, maintenance, and public safety along the public promenade, Overlook Walk, Pier 58, and Pier 62 at Waterfront Park.

Be sure to visit the links above to learn more about what each organization does to support this project.

Waterfront Park Overview

A tree-lined pathway connecting the Waterfront to the stadium district and its neighbors, the Chinatown-International District and Pioneer Square.

Notable Features:

  • Lumen Field
  • Stadium Plaza
  • King Street Station

Learn More

Lush, green east-west connections between a historic neighborhood the Waterfront.

Notable Features:

  • Improved pedestrian pathways
  • Washington Street Boat Landing
  • Local vendors

Learn More

Downtown residents have a new escape from the hustle and bustle of the city thanks to a serene pocket beach, just south of the King County Water Taxis.

Notable Features:

  • Beach access
  • Elliott Bay Seawall
  • Art & Play: Buster Simpson Sculpture

Learn More

A link from the downtown core to ferries, water taxis, and Puget Sound.

Notable Features:

  • Art: George Tsutakawa
  • Colman Dock
  • Marion St. Pedestrian Bridge
  • Art: Oscar Tuazon & Collaborators

Learn More

Featuring the Seattle Great Wheel, restaurants, and shops, the historic piers offer year-round opportunities to eat, drink, and play.

Notable Features:

  • Boardwalk
  • Union St. Pedestrian Bridge
  • Art: Haddad|Drugan
  • Art: Norie Sato

Learn More About the Park Promenade
Learn More About the Union Street Pedestrian Bridge

The new Pier 58 will be a new hub for gathering, activity, and play. Visitors will be treated to timeless views of Elliott Bay and the Olympic mountains, fun seasonal programming, and so much more.

Notable Features:

  • Jellyfish Playground
  • Fitzgerald Fountain
  • Restrooms
  • Concierge
  • Art:  Qwalsius-Shaun Peterson of the Puyallup Tribe

Learn More

The cultural hub of the waterfront ties together two iconic waterfront destinations, Pike Place Market and the Seattle Aquarium, with added space for activities and sweeping views.

Notable Features:

  • Art: Shaun Peterson
  • Art: Derek Bruno and Gage Hamilton
  • Art: MTK Matriarchs
  • Art: Ann Hamilton
  • Art: Stephen Vitiello
  • Play structures

Learn More

Our neighbors at Pike Place Market and the Seattle Aquarium are bringing new attractions and community spaces to the Waterfront through their own expansions — the MarketFront & Ocean Pavilion.

Notable Features:

  • New vending opportunities
  • Additional housing
  • Parking
  • New exhibits
  • The oculus
  • Connection to the Park Promenade

Learn More

Pier 62 hosts an array of free park programs for locals and visitors of all ages, while also serving as an excellent space for visitors to relax and breakaway from the busy boardwalk as they soak in the spectacular views.

Notable Features:

  • Floating Dock
  • Public seating
  • Soccer
  • Chess, checkers, and other games
  • Sensory kits
  • Public restrooms

Learn More

Connecting the waterfront to Olympic Sculpture Park, Bell Street Park, and an active neighborhood brimming with shopping, food, and nightlife.

Notable Features:

  • Lenora St. Pedestrian Bridge
  • Bell St. Park Extension
  • Elliott Bay Connections
  • Protected bike lanes
  • Increased pedestrian amenities and sidewalks

Learn More

Photo courtesy of the City of Seattle and Tim Rice Aerials

Rendering by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Rendering by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Railroad Way

Prioritizing Pedestrians

Improved sidewalks and greenery will support safe pedestrian connections between the waterfront and Pioneer Square. Seahawks, Sounders, and Mariners fans will have easy access to Waterfront Park and public transportation options by land or sea.

Photo of improved pedestrian crossing in Pioneer Square courtesy of the City of Seattle

Photo of new pathways and greenery in Pioneer Square courtesy of the City of Seattle

Photo of "Shoreline Alley" pavement design courtesy of the City of Seattle

Rendering by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Pioneer Square

Connecting Parks and People

Waterfront Park will link directly to Occidental Square, located in the heart of the historic Pioneer Square neighborhood. London Plane trees, spacious sidewalks, outdoor seating, and many small businesses welcome visitors daily.

Connecting Past and Present

The historic Washington Street Boat Landing will anchor the south end of Waterfront Park near Pioneer Square. Recently restored, it once again serves as a symbolic gateway to the city from the Puget Sound.

Habitat Beach. Image by Erik Holsather.

Now Open: Pioneer Square Habitat Beach

Friends guided kayak tour of the Elliott Bay Seawall under the light-penetrating surface.

Image by Rhoades Clark courtesy of DSA.

Image by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Pioneer Square Habitat Beach

Creating a Sustainable Future

Habitat Beach supports the waterfront ecosystem and enhances the salmon corridor by adding rocks and nearshore vegetation. Habitat Beach will provide direct access to the water for visitors.

The Elliott Bay Seawall

Created in partnership with scientists at the University of Washington, the Elliott Bay Seawall optimizes the salmon migration corridor with improved habitat, including natural texture to encourage plant growth, nooks for shellfish, and a cantilevered section with glass bricks to provide needed light.

Photo courtesy of the City of Seattle and Tim Rice Aerials

An aerial photo featuring the Marion Street Bridge connecting to Colman Dock.

Photo by Tim Rice, courtesy of the City of Seattle

People walk towards downtown Seattle from Colman Dock on the new Marion Street Pedestrian Bridge.

Photo courtesy of the City of Seattle

Image by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

New Views of the Water

A Place to Move, or to Pause

The new Marion Street Bridge offers stunning views of Seattle’s central waterfront while maintaining the direct connection between the ferries and downtown.

In partnership with WSDOT, the City has rebuilt the Marion Street Bridge from Western Avenue to Colman Dock. The new bridge serves as a direct connection between the ferries and downtown, and offer a well-lit, wider walkway with stunning views of Seattle’s central waterfront.                                                                           

Photo of new bike lanes facing north, featuring the Marion Street Pedestrian Bridge in the background. Courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Photo of the Park Promenade boardwalk and new plantings. Courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Two wooden park benches lined up against new planters at the Park Promenade. A King County Metro bus can be seen in the background.

Photo of new park benches along the promenade by Tim Rice. Courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Render by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Pathways for People

The Heart of the Waterfront

The Promenade will be the common connector of Waterfront Park — providing a linear pathway from Pioneer Square to Pier 62 and improving access to waterfront activities. A new two-way bike path will serve commuters, visitors, and families along the same route.

A place for moving, resting, and play, the walkway along the promenade will be punctuated by benches and swings.

A Slower Pace in an Urban Place

A generous two-way bike path will span the Waterfront, allowing cyclists to recreate and commute safely and efficiently. The promenade, boardwalk, bike path, and parallel plantings will create a safe pedestrian haven to move and enjoy the new waterfront.

Photo of Norie Sato's "Unfurling a Gesture (The Persistence of Nature)" at the Union St. Pedestrian Bridge by Jo Cosme.

A worm's eye view photo of a fern-like sculpture arching over the Union Street Pedestrian Bridge steps.

Photo of Norie Sato's "Unfurling a Gesture (The Nature of Persistence)" by Sunny Martini.

Two individuals stand on the far end of the Union Street Pedestrian Bridge, with a fern-like metallic sculpture arching over them. On the left, there is another metal art piece reminiscent of bird wings.

Photo of the Union Street Pedestrian Bridge.

Union Street Pedestrian Bridge

A Revitalized Connection

Visitors passing through Western Avenue from Post Alley to the north, or the Harbor Steps to the south now have easier access to Alaskan Way thanks to the Union Street Pedestrian Bridge.

This new connection features a new staircase, elevator, and elevated walkway, making it an excellent location for taking in panoramic views of the iconic waterfront. It also serves as the home to local artist, Norie Sato’s “Unfurling a Gesture (The Nature of Persistence)”, two abstracted metal sculptures of a fern and seagull wings that frame the passageway.

 

Aerial photo of the Pier 58 construction site by Tim Rice, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Render by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Render by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle

Render by Field Operations, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Pier 58

A Place for Gathering, Activity, and Play

 

Seasonal activities such as concerts, outdoor movies, and festivals will take place in an expansive plaza and event space. The pier will offer a marine-themed playground, a large open lawn with shaded areas, and public restrooms for visitors to enjoy. Its design also sustains the marine habitat by promoting the passage of natural light and aquatic plant growth.

The beloved Waterfront Fountain by James FitzGerald and Margaret Tomkins, located on Pier 58 since 1974, will be restored and integrated into the new pier.

An aerial photo of Waterfront Park featuring from Left to Right, Pier 62, Overlook Walk, and the Seattle Aquarium. Photo by Tim Rice, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Photo of the Overlook Walk Cafe's intricate glass awning, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Photo of the view from Overlook Walk, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

A rendering of part of the future Waterfront Park including Overlook Walk. Image by Field Operations courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Overlook Walk

An Elevated Public Park

 

Overlook Walk will be an elevated public park that connects Pike Place Market’s expansion, MarketFront, to the waterfront promenade. Boasting panoramic views of Elliott Bay, the Olympics, and Mount Rainier. Overlook Walk will provide direct access to the waterfront with sloping pedestrian pathways, the Salish Steps, and a new elevator.

Seamlessly integrated with Seattle Aquarium’s Ocean Pavilion expansion, Overlook Walk will offer play areas for children and families, public plazas, and terraced landscaping rich with native plants. Protected areas will feature public seating and amenities.

An Inviting Pathway with Opportunities for Play

 

Bluff Walk will be a beautiful and welcoming pathway that slopes gently, crossing back and forth down the bluff, connecting Pike Place Market with the waterfront some 80 feet below.

Featuring an array of options for rest, play, and reflection, Bluff Walk will include nooks and crannies, a cafe, and slides. It will serve as an active, engaging passageway between the Ocean Pavilion, adjacent piers, and Waterfront Park.

Aerial photo of the Overlook Walk and Ocean Pavilion construction site by Tim Rice, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Photo of the Pike Place MarketFront by Lara Swimmer

Photo of the Ocean Pavilion construction site, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

MarketFront and Ocean Pavilion

Expanding a Beloved Touchstone

 

The completed MarketFront includes new housing, restaurants, and retail space, plus expanded vendor opportunities and parking.

The New Ocean Pavilion

 

Seattle Aquarium’s new expansion, the Ocean Pavilion, will be an unparalleled platform for ocean conservation. Exhibits will shed light on the urgent threats facing our ocean and mobilize a new generation of marine conservationists.

Integrated into the design of Overlook Walk, the roof of the Ocean Pavilion will offer public park space, stellar views of the Salish Sea, and a seamless connection to the Promenade below. An oculus will offer the public a dramatic window into the Coral Triangle from the Promenade.

An aerial photo of Pier 62. Photo by Erik Holsather.

Photo by Tosin Arasi

Xopantla Tianquiztli 2022 at Pier 62. Photo by Sunny Martini.

Guma' Gela' on stage at Indigiqueer at Waterfront Park (a beautiful person in an irridescent gold dress, with sky blue paint lines adorning their legs 2022, walks the stage runway as attendees look on. A blue sky and downtown Seattle skyline are visible behind. A person and child appear to be stepping on to the stage as well.) Photo by Robert Wade.

Guma' Gela' on stage at Indigiqueer 2022 at Waterfront Park. Photo by Robert Wade.

Pier 62

A Canvas for the Community

 

With a new floating dock, integrated lighting, flexible seating, and an acre of open space in the heart of Seattle’s central waterfront, Pier 62 serves as a welcoming canvas for a range of year-round public use.

Opened in 2020, Pier 62 marks the beginning of the Seattle waterfront’s next chapter. From live music and dance performances to soccer, fishing, yoga, and more, Pier 62 hosts an array of free park programs for visitors of all ages.

Elliott Way's Honorary Name, Dzidzilalich. Photo by Jo Cosme.

Photo of new sidewalks and bike lanes along Elliott Way courtesy of the City of Seattle

West-facing photo of the Lenora Street Pedestrian Bridge that connects Elliott Way to Waterfront Park, courtesy of the City of Seattle.

Enhanced plantings in Myrtle Edwards Park and Centennial Park. Image by Walker Macy, courtesy of the Downtown Seattle Association.

Belltown and Beyond

Enhanced Connections between Urban Waterfronts and Neighborhoods

 

Through the City’s Bell Street Improvements Project and the Downtown Seattle Association’s Elliott Bay Connections Project, accessing our urban waterfronts will be easier than ever before.

Both projects will provide additional bike lanes, sidewalks, and other pedestrian amenities, as well as additional plantings and improved green spaces.

A crowd of people are gathered at Pier 62 in front of the Pier Sounds stage as the sun sets in the distance.

Porter Ray performs at Pier Sounds 2022, photo by Sunny Martini

Dancing on the pier. Photo by Sunny Martini.

Additional Resources

Find more information about Waterfront Park by checking out some of these quick links:

Visit the Office of the Waterfront and Civic Projects website for construction and design resources.

Find Waterfront news and other helpful guides by visiting our friends at the Seattle Historic Waterfront Association.

Created in Partnership With